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Tuesday, February 4, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Merchant of Venice found in the catalog.

The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare

The Merchant of Venice

  • 6 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Gramercy Books in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Venice (Italy),
  • Italy
    • Subjects:
    • Jews -- Italy -- Drama,
    • Moneylenders -- Drama,
    • Venice (Italy) -- Drama

    • Edition Notes

      StatementWilliam Shakespeare ; illustrated in color by Sir James D. Linton ; illustrated in black and white by Sir John Gilbert.
      GenreDrama.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPR2825 .A1 1994
      The Physical Object
      Pagination127 p. :
      Number of Pages127
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1434109M
      ISBN 10051710122X
      LC Control Number93045946
      OCLC/WorldCa29564172

      Weber played Portia and Smalley, her husband, played Shylock. Shakespeare wrote sonnets, all published onmost of which were dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothsley, The Earl of Southhampton. First let us go to dinner. They are joined, unexpectedly, by Lorenzo and Jessica. The only one contains her portrait, and whoever chooses that one wins her hand. Bassanio is a surprising and confounding character in all.

      He and Portia rejoice, and Gratiano confesses that he has fallen in love with Nerissa. In a interview with Theater magazine, Adler pointed out that Shylock is a wealthy man, "rich enough to forgo the interest on three thousand ducats" and that Antonio is "far from the chivalrous gentleman he is made to appear. On all sides, Shylock is surrounded by enemies. Jessica, The Merchant of Venice [1] The central plot of The Merchant of Venice is relatively straightforward: Antonio borrows money from Shylock to help his friend, Bassanio, court Portiabut, through misfortune, is unable to repay and is subjected to an onerous default a literal "pound of flesh" cut from his body. Shylock tells the jailer not to speak to Antonio.

      She tells him that he must cut precisely one pound of flesh, no more, no less; she advises him that "if the The Merchant of Venice book do turn, But in the estimation of a hair, Thou diest and all thy goods are confiscate. Portia and Nerissa finally end the charade and show the rings, telling their husbands to be more careful with them. Jessica, The Merchant of Venice [14] In the following scene—Act 2, Scene 6—Lorenzo and his friends come to Shylock's house, and Jessica greets them from a window, dressed as a boy. Portia hopes that it is Bassanio and she and Nerissa go to greet the suitor. The two ladies then hasten back to Belmont to tease their husbands about the rings. Shylock hastily decides that he will accept the triple payment of the bond, but Portia says no; Shylock then offers to take only the original three thousand ducats, but again Portia refuses, reminding him that it was he himself who demanded the strict interpretation of the law.


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The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare Download PDF Ebook

One of the reasons for this interpretation is that Shylock's painful status in Venetian society is emphasised. Portia calls upon Shylock to be merciful, but he asks why he should be.

Auden describes Antonio as "a man whose emotional life, though his conduct may be chaste, is concentrated upon a member of his own sex. The Duke says that he has sent for council from a lawyer and a messenger has arrived with the information.

Five Fascinating Facts about The Merchant of Venice

Granville cut the clownish Gobbos [22] in line with neoclassical decorum ; he added a jail scene between Shylock and Antonio, and a more extended scene of toasting at a banquet scene. He seems to be using the law as an excuse to take his revenge for helping his daughter escape his house by killing Antonio.

I came away believing that he was more wronged than anyone in the play whom he harmed. There is not any other moral standard for the characters. Bibliografische Informationen. Let no such man be trusted.

Quotes from The Merchant of Venice

O, my ducats! Malone charges the editor of the second folio so strongly with ignorance, I have no doubt but that did is the true reading, as it is clearly better sense than that which he has adopted.

The Merchant of Venice

Malone, however, supposes him to mean only—carry thee away from thy father's house. He has insulted the Jew The Merchant of Venice book spat on him, yet he comes with hypocritical politeness to borrow money of him.

Bassanio enters at this and Launcelot begs him to take him on as a servant. However, in this story the Christian lover flees alone with the treasure. If you poison us, do we not die? But when he opens the chest, a skull with a scroll are all that sit inside.

When the Christians exhort Shylock to release Antonio, he asks them why Antonio should The Merchant of Venice book treated differently from their slaves, considering that he was bought by Shylock via the contract. Let not the sound of shallow fopp'ry enter My sober house.

The play was entered in the Register of The Merchant of Venice book Stationers Companythe method at that time of obtaining copyright for a new play, by James Roberts on 22 July under the title The Merchant of Venice, otherwise called The Jew of Venice.

Shylock has become more determined to exact revenge from Christians because his daughter Jessica eloped with the Christian Lorenzo and converted.

InCharles Macklin returned to the original text in a very successful production at Drury Lanepaving the way for Edmund Kean seventy years later see below. Since Bassanio has no collateral, Antonio goes to Shylock to borrow money. Bassanio pleads with Shylockto accept double the money due him, but Shylock refuses.

It is the basis of the text published in the First Foliowhich adds a number of stage directions, mainly musical cues.The Merchant of Venice Author: William Shakespeare, Henry Livingston Withers, Morris William Croll.

The Merchant of Venice Summary Read the full text of The Merchant of Venice with a side-by-side translation HERE. The Merchant of Venice opens on a street in Venice (there are streets and not just canals in Venice—who knew?) where Antonio, a Venetian merchant, complains of a.

The Merchant of Venice was first printed in in quarto, of which nineteen copies survive. This was followed by a printing, and later an inclusion in the First Folio in The play was written shortly after Christopher Marlowe's immensely popular Jew of Malta (), a play wherein a Jew named Barabas plays a greatly exaggerated villain.M ERCHANT OF V ENI C E (C A Pdf / 1 Merchant of Venice ACT I SCENE I.

Venice. A street. Enter ANTONIO, SALARINO, and SALANIO ANT ONI O In truth, I know not why I am so sad.Download pdf would have made The Merchant of Venice better?

Not being one of Shakespeare's better plays, most of the first acts (60% of the play) is pretty dull with only a few bright spots. The so-called comic relief is anything but, and the secondary characters are without personality, while the leading characters are dreary or dull.William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice was probably written between and ebook, and was printed with the comedies in the First Folio of Bassanio, an impoverished gentleman, uses the credit of his friend, the merchant Antonio, to borrow money from a wealthy Jew, Shylock.